If you want to be a veterinarian, you better like people!

My advice to anyone aspiring to be a veterinarian? Get used to talking to people.

Pursuing a career in veterinary medicine is tough. Just considering the process of applying to veterinary school is daunting. There are numerous standardized tests, the need for superior letters of recommendation, and the stress associated with composing the perfect personal statement of why you’re choosing this particular path. Individuals must have top notch grades, possess a wide breadth of animal-related work experience, and be well-rounded in their extra-curricular activities.

Plenty of worthy applicants are denied admission based due to a lack of available spots. The competition is palpable, and is potentially one of the biggest detriments to the vocation. The aggressive nature of the application process selects for individuals who excel academically. All too often, such individuals lack critical attributes such as comfort with public speaking or interpersonal interactions.

It’s no mystery that veterinary medicine requires a love for animals and science. Whether pursuing small or large animal practice, or a career as a wildlife or zoo vet, or even biological research, individuals are driven by a passion to preserve the health and welfare of animals.

What is often overlooked is the extent to which veterinarians must work with people. Though driven by a passion for helping animals, those working in the profession will be always be surrounded by owners, other veterinarians, technicians, assistants, co-workers, practice managers, owners, etc. who each require time, energy, and attention.

Every pet that steps through my exam room is attached to at least one human being. My interactions with animals comes easy, but those with people come less naturally. Further complicating my particular scenario is that as a veterinary oncologist, I meet people at an extremely emotional time in their lives. I possess no formal training in grief counseling or psychology. My education regarding “bedside manner” comes entirely from personal experience, both as a patient myself and over my years of worming in the field.

I may be walking into my third canine lymphoma consult of the morning, while the people I’m meeting with have never even considered their dog could be diagnosed with cancer. I have to be able to connect with those individuals despite having to repeat facts multiple times within the same work day.

I could be running a half an hour or more behind on appointments, or lack appropriate support staff, or simply not feel well and am still expected to complete my daily roster of appointments with the same amount of kindness and care as I would on a less busy or emotionally tolling day.

The animals I work with never consider my credentials or bedside manner, but I will constantly be judged by their owners on my knowledge, compassion, and ability to make them feel as though their dog or cat is the only pet I am seeing that day. I’m cognizant of how owners acutely remember every word I say and every interaction I have with them and their animal, even when doing so exceeds my reservoir of compassion and my abilities are worn thin.

The best advice I could give would be to learn how to be comfortable speaking to people and in front of groups of people. Learn about how people learn and process information. Discover new ways to listen to people. Observe and record their behavior. Consider ways to keep yourself interactive, even when you don’t feel as though you want to. There will be so many times during your career as a veterinarian you will want to withdraw, but be forced to continue to talk. You won’t always be comfortable doing so, but you need to find sooner rather than later if you’re able to push through your comfort zone.

Attempting these activities is especially important if you’re a particularly shy person. While studying, and memorizing facts will afford you the academic qualifications, what will carry you through this profession as a career will be the way you interact with other people. The more you practice these tasks, the more comfortable you will become with the process.

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2 thoughts on “If you want to be a veterinarian, you better like people!

  1. Bekah Keesler says:

    So true and well said! And although I like to think my specialty (pathology) is less social, we often interact with owners or vets that are having their worst days or are at the end of their ropes.

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  2. rontuaru says:

    My hat is so off to you. It pretty much goes without saying that vets usually like their patients. It’s the people that are tough. I’ve never had the misfortune of needing the services of an oncologist, but I figure it’s only a matter of time. That said, I did have two young active herding dogs who developed severe eye diseases that resulted in the loss of 3 out of 4 eyes between the two of them. While that was not an experience I’m anxious to ever repeat, it was made all the more tolerable by the kindness and genuine compassion of our specialists. I’ve also utilized the services of a canine neurologist and experienced the same thing. I love my vets. Sometimes we disagree on the right protocol for a certain situation, but I have nothing but respect for them. I hope your clients realize how tough your job truly is.

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